When facing a traffic citation, many people decide that it is easier to pay the ticket and move on with life. However, drivers should know that doing so is essentially an admission of guilt in the eyes of the law. In addition to the cost of the citation itself, a speeding ticket or other traffic violation may result in points added against the driver’s record, higher insurance rates and a potential license suspension.

In Georgia, the cost of a ticket may be especially high thanks to the Super Speeder law the state introduced in 2010. This law imposes an extra fine on top of the citation itself for motorists who drive too fast, and drivers who do not pay the fine promptly may have their license suspended. In 2018 alone, Super Speeder tickets generated over $21 million in state revenue.

What is a Super Speeder?

The Super Speeder law applies to drivers who meet or exceed 75 miles per hour on any divided two-lane road or meets or exceeds 85 miles per hour on any highway, regardless of the posted limit. Once convicted, the motorist must pay a $200 fee on top of other penalties or fines.

How do drivers know they owe the Super Speeder fee?

In addition to the citation and court fees, Super Speeders must pay a separate fine that the Georgia Department of Driver Services issues via first class mail. Drivers have 120 days from the date of this notice to settle the fee with DDS. The department automatically suspends a motorist’s license if he or she fails to pay the fine within the 120-day period, with an added $50 fee for reinstatement.

Does a Super Speeder conviction mean extra points against a driver’s license?

The Georgia point system treats all speeding violations the same way, so there are no additional points for a Super Speeder offense. However, because the DDS assigns points based on how much faster than the speed limit a driver was going, a Super Speeder conviction may result in as many as six points added to a motorist’s license.