Marriages end for a lot of different reasons, but not all couples want to talk about their private challenges and conflicts in court. The state of Georgia recognizes some grounds for divorce based on fault, but when petitioners use them as the bases of their divorces they must present evidence to show that their requests to end their marriages are sound. In order to avoid discussing sensitive topics like adultery, cruelty, and criminal activity in divorce court, many people choose to base their divorces on the no-fault grounds of an irretrievably broken marriage.

An irretrievably broken marriage is one that no longer functions in a productive way. For different couples, different forms of evidence will demonstrate the manner in which their marriages are broken beyond repair. In order to file for a no-fault divorce based on an irretrievably broken marriage, one of the parties to the divorce proceedings must live in Georgia for at least 6 months.

Before filing for divorce, it is important that an individual understands what rights they have and how different options may affect their ability to live following the end of their marriage. A divorce, regardless of the grounds on which it is based, may involve negotiations over the division of property, custodial options for the care and placement of children, and support paid from one divorcing party to the other.

Legal advice on divorce is often an important component of an individual feeling as though they are prepared for the legal proceedings that will ultimately end their relationship. This post does not offer any legal advice and readers should seek their own counsel from a knowledgeable divorce and family law attorney to become informed on the specifics of their own legal proceedings.